After governing for just north of two and a half years, Sarah Palin resigned as chief of Alaska this weekend. Her resignation was notable for myriad reasons, but the most interesting one is the incoherent, unintelligible, irresponsibly loquacious speech that she delivered announcing that she was stepping down. It is a text thick with attacks on the media, exclamation points about reform in Alaska, and rebukes on anyone who dared criticize Palin’s ethics, management skills or governing practices.

When analyzing her speech, the most alarming position Palin takes is that her resignation is yet another example of how she swims against the current, refusing to buckle under the crushing weight of “politics as usual,” instead blasting through that smothersome ceiling by resigning as governor so that she can work tirelessly for Alaskans elsewhere.

Elsewhere, other than as the state’s governor? If this is a woman who seeks the Presidency, that same media that vociferously attacked her during and after she emerged with John McCain is going to have a field day with this. This should not surprise Palin, but inevitably it will. She can save some time and prepare now for the questions she’ll face when she announces her run for President.

“Governor Palin, you famously resigned from office, citing the ability to move Alaska forward from a position in the private sector. Why, now, have you decided that public office is once more the most efficient means of assisting our citizens?”

I can’t understand how a politician gunning for the Presidency can strategize this as a move in the right direction.

The most alarming commentary in her speech was her remark about lame duck governors, as if during her weekly session her local Wasilla psychic, Palin saw the future, and it didn’t augur re-election. Palin was very much eligible for re-election in 2010, which would have concluded two years before any run for the Presidency. Perhaps she resigned because there were very real concerns, such as the ability to run a gubernatorial campaign in 2010 followed months later by exploratory work and subsequent Presidential campaigning in 2011. Plenty valid, that.

Or, perhaps, she just didn’t think she’d win re-election. That sounds slightly less likely, but would explain Palin’s comments about lame duck governors. She goes on to say

And so as I thought about this announcement that I wouldn’t run for re-election and what it means for Alaska, I thought about how much fun some governors have as lame ducks… travel around the state, to the Lower 48 (maybe), overseas on international trade – as so many politicians do. And then I thought – that’s what’s wrong – many just accept that lame duck status, hit the road, draw the paycheck, and “milk it”. I’m not putting Alaska through that – I promised efficiencies and effectiveness! That’s not how I am wired. I am not wired to operate under the same old “politics as usual.”

So concerned was Sarah Palin that she would become lackadaisical and apathetic during her last year as governor, she just decided to give up.

Give that girl my vote.

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March 20, 2009

A conversation that I had with my good friend Wabi tonight.

Wabi: Wells Fargo also didn’t want TARP, and again was told to take it.  Goldman Sachs wanted it, but had they known the restrictions that came with it, they could’ve raised private capital, like they did from Warren Buffet.  And US Bancorp has always been considered a pretty healthy bank, and Bank of America was healthy before it bought Merrill Lynch.  Nevermind the fact that even if you are healthy, if your competitors are getting injections of capital from the government, you are basically in a position where you have to take them or place yourself at a disadvantage.

Dan: Just like baseball and steroids.